Afghanistan

Mission > Where We Work > Afghanistan
An infographic displaying statistics for Afghanistan

Overview

With its history of civil and international war, Afghanistan struggles to maintain its democracy and continue its reconstruction efforts of the last decade. The country is a mosaic of cultures, tribes and ethnicities.

A young Afghani girl smiling

Three decades of conflict and an array of natural disasters, including drought, earthquake, flood and heavy snow, make living conditions challenging, especially for the poor. Access to basic social services is minimal throughout the country, particularly in remote villages, which not only lack clinics but also good roads and communication. Gender inequity makes it difficult for women to access adequate health care, and many women are subjected to abuse and violence.

Afghanistan has the world’s highest infant mortality rate. About 20 percent of children do not reach their fifth birthday.

ChildFund has served children in Afghanistan since 2001.

Safety and Protection

An uncertain political environment means children are often neglected, abandoned and abused. ChildFund Afghanistan has created Child Well-Being Committees to engage communities in post-conflict healing and to protect children. This work involves training parents, community members and government staff in basic child protection issues. ChildFund has worked in reintegration of children by training and mentoring social workers and child rights practitioners in legal and social work institutions.

Despite many policy interventions, women in Afghanistan suffer high rates of physical, sexual and psychological violence. Other forms of abuse include forced marriage, domestic violence, human trafficking and denial of basic services, including education and health care.

To improve conditions for women and girls, ChildFund works to provide legal support, mediation and prevention techniques.

 

Protecting Health

ChildFund rehabilitated 33 community health posts and trained 66 community health volunteers to provide basic services.

ChildFund also teaches mothers about prenatal care. In Nangarhar province, the rate of pregnant mothers’ going for regular prenatal check-ups increased from 37 percent to 90 percent. Mothers are also ensuring their children are immunized and their growth monitored regularly, and they more often consult health providers when their children are sick.

Trained volunteers educate children and families about healthy practices including hand washing, sanitation and hygiene. ChildFund constructed more than 1,000 covered wells and hand pumps to provide communities with safe drinking water.

Through the RESTART project in the eastern region of the country, ChildFund offers feeding sessions for more than 1,200 children and has constructed seven solar-powered water system wells that provide safe drinking water to more than 1,350 refugee families.

Support for Learning

The RESTART project in Nangarhar province educates parents on child development and improved parenting skills, reaching more than 1,000 mothers. For preschool-age children in the area, ChildFund has constructed five Early Childhood Development centers, serving 200 children from refugee families.

In Afghanistan, only 18 percent of women and girls ages 15-24 can read and write. ChildFund provides community-based literacy classes specifically for women and girls, but also supports literacy classes for men and boys. ChildFund also opened 74 community libraries.

And, because playing is learning, ChildFund provided playground equipment to Children’s Resource Centers and schools, benefiting more than 1,000 children.

Accountability

ChildFund International has earned high ratings from Charity Navigator, the American Institute of Philanthropy and Charities Review Council.

Learn more about our financial accountability »

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